Cost of nominated MPs, Maize divides the Rift, Mzee Moi preparing Gideon: Your Breakfast Briefing

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Good Morning

Senior officers at the African Union Commission have been harassing young female staffers on contract for sex, an inquiry report has revealed.

A special committee commissioned in May by AUC chairman Moussa Faki to probe allegations of sexual harassment also reveals massive corruption and nepotism incidents.

Here are the stories making headlines in the Star this Saturday morning.

Jitters over PSC plan to limit term of Clerk

Controversy is brewing over proposed radical changes to the administration of Parliament, including term limits for the clerks.

The Star has established that the Parliamentary Service Bill, 2018, has split staff with intense lobbying and discussion over its implications and objectives.

The bill went into the Second Reading stage on Thursday and MPs are likely to take a vote next week when debate is concluded.

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The burden of nominated MPs

As the 12th Parliament clamours for increased women representation, mixed reactions have been drawn on whether there is even the need to retain the current MPs and MCAs.

Kenya’s high wage bill is blamed on, among other costs, the huge salaries paid to nominated MCAs, members of the National Assembly, the Senate and their aides, something critics claim is an unnecessary burden on taxpayers.

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Maize crisis splits the Rift, as farmers stare at bleak future in maize farming

The maize crisis in the Rift Valley has once again sparked off a major political and economic storm, which has split leaders in the region and left farmers staring at a possibly bleak future in their farming.

With a very unstable market for maize, whose prices at the moment limit any benefits for producers, there has been a debate on farmers diversifying to grow other crops such as avocado but this has equally caused the maize crisis to take an interesting political angle.

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How Moi is preparing the way for Gideon in 2036

By the time Togo President Faure Gnassingbé serves out his third term, he and his father — Togo’s fifth president Gnassingbé Eyadema—, who he succeeded, will have run the country for 48 years.

This will be 87 per cent of the country’s 55-year history.

Gabon has a similar experience with a father and son at the helm of the country for over 86 per cent of its post-independence history — 47 years out of almost 55 years — and the son is still in power.

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Bungoma smallscale farmers sell 27 tons of harvest

Consolata Khaemba, a 33-year-old mother of four from Kamtion village in Bungoma is smiling at the work of her hands.

For years, has enjoyed farming as a sense of belonging and as part of the local culture.

But now, she is also earning an income from her efforts.

When she heard about Kilimototo, a social enterprise for farmers, she knew she has to be part of the success.

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For more on these stories and others, keep browsing the Star website for the latest news making headlines across Kenya and around the world.

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By Kenyan Digest

The Kenyan Digest Team